Review: Style Me Vintage, Home

Style Me Vintage, HomeHaving already reviewed a couple of titles in the extremely accessible Style Me Vintage book series, I was asked by the publisher if I would like to review a couple more on Rarely Wears Lipstick. Obviously the answer was yes, and the first of the pair – Style Me Vintage: Home – arrived in the post last week.

Written by vintage shop owner and blogger Keeley Harris, this book has a similar format to the title on vintage clothing, with sections on the styles of different decades of the twentieth century, from the 1920s through to the 1970s. There are tips on styles to look out for, how to get started and where to buy, plus a checklist of what types of objects to keep an eye out for on your vintage shopping trips – including furniture, ornaments, textiles and kitchenalia (which I didn’t think was a real word, but apparently is!). For someone who has no clue about vintage interiors, this was a very useful format for finding a way in to something that can seem a bit daunting. After all, it can seem so much easier just to go to Ikea when you need a sideboard even if it’s nowhere near as stylish!

Style Me Vintage, HomeThe book features photos of genuine homes that have been either authentically styled or simply inspired by a certain era, which gives a couple of different ways of approaching giving a vintage look to your home. Although I was thrilled by the images of Rachel and Dave’s 30s Art Deco home, not least because so much of the furniture reminded me of my gran’s house, it was so perfect that it could seem rather intimidating if you are thinking of it as a final look you’re aiming to achieve. However, seeing Carrie and Michael’s 40s-style home included in the book was a nice introduction for anyone starting out as they say they “wanted to create a warm cosy house full of nostalgia”, which is definitely something that a lot of people can relate to. Seeing a beautiful home that wasn’t entirely furnished with genuine vintage items or 100% period appropriate furniture was a lovely addition. It also made the images seem more real and less like film sets.

Each decade chapter has some background information, before covering design influences, details and how to get the look. I wasn’t sure any of it was especially suitable for my home, but the 50s-style kitchens and fantastically kitsch tiki bar were delightful, and I still have a desire for a 70s-style guest bedroom as an outlet for all my quirky home interior tastes. If you want to add a bit of vintage style to your home, or are simply keen on not buying brand new furniture, this book is a great way to get started. Even if you’re just interested in seeing inside other people’s houses, this book definitely satisfies where interiors magazines fail.

DISCLOSURE: I was sent a copy of Style Me Vintage: Home free to review by Pavilion Books.

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